Revit Schedule Title

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could easily give a Revit schedule any view name that you want and have a different title appear at the top of the schedule on a sheet?  You can!

By default, the View Name parameter in the Properties of the schedule will appear as the title for the schedule.  As of Revit 2014, you can edit the title to be what you desire, regardless of the view name.  That allows you to name the schedule whatever you desire to aid with project browser organization and providing a good description of the schedule’s purpose. Continue reading

Are Revit Dependent Views Still Needed?

Autodesk introduced dependent views to Revit several releases ago and they have been a popular feature when you have a large building with multiple units/areas in order to show the entire floor plan at a scale of say 1/8″=1′-0″.  When they were introduced, they were great as they allowed us to break up a large floor plan into manageable units and control the visibility of all units by only modifying one view.  We were able to get good consistency and increased speed, along with having view reference tags for adjoining views.  I thought is was a great feature.

However, is the use of dependent views still as important at it was when they were introduced?  My belief at this time is that they are not as important for everyone.  I think some users will get good benefit from them, but others will get benefit from not using them.

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Revit 2015 Update 11

Autodesk has released Update 11 for Revit 2015.  It appears that the release is primarily about stability of the software, but it is always a good thing to have better stability.

The following are listed improvements in Update 11.

  • Improves stability after editing a dimension witness line and then moving the mouse outside of the Properties palette.
  • Improves stability when creating dimensions.
  • Improves stability when working within a worksharing model with central files on an unstable network environment.
  • Improves stability when modifying a schedule’s appearance when the schedule does not contain table contents and headers.
  • Improves stability when encountering conflicting non-unique extensible storage schemas.

Following are the build numbers for Update 11:

  • Revit 2015 build: 20151207_1515
  • Revit 2015 R2 build: 20151208_0715

Get Update Here

See PDF of Revit 2015 Enhancements

 

Revit Electrical Panel Load Calculation Issues

I was recently exposed to an issue with electrical panel loads that illustrated what I feel are unique characteristics of how Revit circuit loads and Load Classifications affect the values that you see on the electrical panel schedule.  If everything is utilized in Revit exactly as Revit is designed and intended, everything works fine.  However, that rarely happens.  Engineering firms create and customize families, and change or set Load Classifications which can impact the proper loading calculations.

Many companies have electrical panel schedules which display the Loads Summary at the bottom of the panel.  This summary section separates each Load Classification into its own line so that you can see how much Connected Load exists for each different type of Load Classification and the Estimated Demand for each Load Classification.  Those load values are then displayed as the Total Connected Load and the Total Demand Load that should include everything on the panel.  The Total Connected Load is then displayed on a Switchboard panel schedule from which that panel is served.  There are many different variations of how this information is displayed, but the general process is the same.  Subpanels may also be involved, but the same issues exist with those loads.

In reviewing the issue, there were 2 different problems that were manifested in the panel loading.  This article is an attempt to describe those 2 problems to help others understand what may be happening when load numbers don’t add up.  I recommend everyone read the Autodesk Knowledge Network’s explanation of how Load Calculations are supposed to work.  Read it at About Load Calculations.

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Revit 2016 Electrical Improvements

Revit 2016 has been released and you can find various sources for information on the enhancements of the software.  There are lots of nice changes, but I want to focus on electrical enhancements. Some were part of the UR2 release of Revit 2015 available to subscription users, but are included in Revit 2016 for all users.

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Electrical Sub-Panels with Lugs in Revit

I recently had someone ask me how to use Revit to connect an electrical panel to another electrical panel via lugs.  This situation occurs at times in building construction where an electrical sub-panel is wired into another panel via the lugs in the first panel and does not actually use a breaker in the first panel.  This is not normal practice, but does occur.   (Note that this is different than having an electrical sub-panel that has main lugs and does not have a main breaker which actually DOES use a breaker in the panel that feeds the sub-panel.)

For our situation described here, Panel A has a 200 Amp main breaker that controls just the circuit breakers that are seen in Panel A.  Panel B also has a 200 Amp main breaker, but is wired into Panel A at the main lug prior to the Panel A main circuit breaker.  In this case, Panel B needs to show in Revit as fed from Panel A but does not utilize a breaker in Panel A.  By default, Revit will create a breaker on Panel A to control Panel B.  We do not want that to happen in this situation.

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Apply Electrical Panel Template to Panels in Revit

Electrical panel schedules are a very important part of designing and documenting the electrical portion of a building project.  The electrical panel schedules help with designing the electrical system by showing the power requirements on the panel to the designer and allowing the designer to spread the power requirement across the poles of the panel.  It is also useful for showing the electrician how to circuit the items assigned to the panel.  Those 2 different purposes may involve showing slightly different information on the panel schedule.  In addition to that, the facilities manager may even desire to see different information on the panel schedule.

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Revit Schedules with Desired Mechanical Equipment

Revit has objects divided into various preset Categories which makes it easy to manage.  However, it also creates issues when you use the Mechanical Equipment category since it includes so many different types of equipment.  These different types of equipment are typically scheduled separately, so some process needs to be used to separate Mechanical Equipment families into different schedules.

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Residential Door Tag in Revit

Specifying information concerning doors on architectural plans is an important aspect of conveying information to the contractor working in the field.  Residential designers and commercial designers tend to have different approaches to this situation as commercial projects generally utilize a door schedule referencing a number tag at the door and residential projects generally have the door size shown directly on the floor plan.  While it seems like a door size tag for residential projects would be a basic feature in Revit, there are no default tags to display the door size in typical methods.  In this article, we will take a look at a process to create a typical residential door tag.  This process can then be modified slightly to create other variations of the door size tag and also window size tags. Residential Door Tag Multiple in Doors

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Organizing Schedules in Revit Project Browser

Wouldn’t it be nice to easily organize your Revit schedules?  Revit provides the user with various ways of organizing views in the Project Browser to make it easier to find your desired view, but schedules do not have the same organizational capabilities of other types of views.  Most views have a “Title on Sheet” parameter that can be used to be display the desired title for that view when it is placed on the sheet and yet have the View Name parameter be something that organizes well in the Project Browser.  Schedule views do not have that “Title on Sheet” parameter.

Typically, users will name the Schedule view as the name that they desire to appear at the top of the schedule since the “Title on Sheet” parameter does not exist for schedules.  That naming process means that schedules may not organize optimally in the Project Browser since they will be listed alphabetically.  We want to achieve having a title that does not use the schedule name.

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Show Room Occupancy Loads in Revit Schedule

Working with building codes is an important aspect of working as an Architect during the design stages of a project, and knowing the occupancy of each room is a key component to that.  This article will demonstrate how to create a Revit schedule that shows the occupancy load for each room in your BIM file.  It will use a key schedule as the source of information for calculating loads, so this article will address creating that key schedule as well.

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