Multiple Circuit Home Run Arrows in Revit

For many electrical designers using Revit for their construction documents, the home run arrow for circuits is an important part of their drawings.  When multiple circuits are part of one home run, the designer wants to show multiple arrowheads on the circuit leader.  This is an easy task to accomplish in Revit.

homeroomarrows-final

Continue reading

Revit Electrical Panel Schedule Configuration Information

When using Revit for electrical design, using Panel Schedules should be an important part of your design process.  Revit provides the user with some default panel schedule templates with the software, but most organizations modify the templates to function and appear the way that they desire.  Revit allows the user to do quite a bit of customization to the templates, but be aware that there are still limitations to the customization ability and some nuances.

Revit Help has instructions for basic electrical template modification.  In this article, we will look at some aspects of customizing a template that are not so obvious to the user.

Continue reading

Please Use Spaces in Revit MEP

Autodesk Revit includes the ability to define enclosed areas within the building as Rooms or Spaces.  While both items allow the user to assign a name and number to the area, they have different purposes and parameters for information within that designated area.  To put it in the most basic of terms, Rooms are for Architects, Spaces are for Engineers.

I have talked with engineers that don’t believe that they have any need for Spaces.  They believe that using the Rooms in the architect’s model works just fine for them since all they care about is having a tag on the view that shows the room name and number.  If the engineer simply tags the architect’s Rooms, then the names and numbers will always be up to date.  This is a very narrow-sighted view of the purpose of Rooms and Spaces.

Continue reading

One-Line Diagrams in Revit

As I work with electrical engineers who are migrating to Revit, a common question that I get is “How do I create one-line diagrams in Revit”.  One-line diagrams, also called single-line diagrams, are an important part of electrical drawings for construction documents, so it is a subject that needs to be addressed.  They are a simplified method of representing a 3-phase power system that shows distribution boards, switchboards, transformers, panels, breakers, etc., with lines illustrating the connectivity of the components of the distribution system.  The diagram is not just for physical construction of the building’s electrical system, but developed by the electrical engineer during early stages of design.

The problem that you run into with creating one-line diagrams inside Revit is that the one-line diagrams are generally created before the equipment is actually placed in the Revit model.  The electrical engineer will design the building’s electrical system by developing this diagram, then placing the electrical service equipment based upon the diagram.

Unfortunately, Revit does not provide a way of coordinating the one-line diagram with the actual electrical components placed inside Revit, either before the electrical equipment is placed or after the equipment is placed in the model.

Continue reading

Masking Regions in Revit Projects

There are times working within Revit that Masking Regions are needed in order to hide/cover model information within a project file.  There can be various reasons for this, so I won’t discuss the “why” you would do it.  You will recognize the need when you confront it.  However, when working with Masking Regions, it is always good to know the guidelines and rules for how they work.

Following is an illustration of a Masking Region covering part of a simple model.

Masking Region Example

Continue reading

Revit Copy Monitor Item Change Notification

Architects and Engineers that collaborate on projects using Revit will typically link their models together to see the other discipline’s design within their model.  Part of that process often includes one discipline using the Copy/Monitor function within Revit to copy specific model items from the other discipline’s model into their own model.  Revit has a new twist on the coordination review feature when you monitor items between different project files.

(Please note that this article only addresses the new twist and does not explain the process of linking files or using the copy/monitor function.)

Continue reading

Unload Revit Link Per User

Autodesk has just released the Revit 2016 R2 update to users that are on the subscription program (both maintenance and desktop).  Autodesk has started providing these R2 releases mid-year and can include significant improvements.  While there are reportedly 25 updates in this release, there is one that I particularly like as a user working on a model with multiple other users.  That is the ability to unload a Revit link on a per user basis.

Prior to 2016 R2, if I unload a Revit link and Save to Central, the file will be unloaded for other users when they Save to Central or Reload Latest.

Being able to unload a Revit link on a per user basis means that I can unload a linked file and I will be the only user affected.  I can save the file to central with the file unloaded and when other users Save to Central or Reload Latest, their version will still have the link loaded.

There are definitely times when I want to increase my Revit’s performance and memory usage and I don’t need a loaded link throughout the day, but I can’t unload it because others need to have the link loaded for their purposes.  You can really annoy other users by unloading a link that they want to use or see.

Continue reading