Room Occupancy Load Tag in Revit View

As an Architect, I find it helpful to be able to look at a floor plan and see the occupancy load for each room, and some building permit reviewers require this information be shown on the plan.  My previous blog article addressed creating a schedule in Revit to show occupancy loads for rooms.  This article will take off from that point and desmonstrate how to create a room tag to place on a floor plan view that shows the occupancy load of the room.

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Revit Family Type Catalogs

When creating families in one of the Revit design software packages, various Types can be created inside the same Family file for variations of the family.  Since some families can grow to be quite large due to many different types, Type Catalogs are used to help control the size of the families in the project.  A couple of examples of this are various door sizes for a door family, and the many various sizes for structural beams.

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Revit Gypsum Board Walls And Ceilings

Autodesk Revit Architecture’s standard project templates contain a stock material named “Gypsum Wallboard”.  The problem with the stock material is that there is no surface pattern.  This works very well for walls since you typically do not want to see any stipple hatch in an elevation view of gypsum board walls.  However, this does not work well for gypsum board ceilings when you actually do want to see a stipple hatch in reflected ceiling plans.  The answer to this problem is to create a new material to use for gypsum board ceilings. 

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Revit View Naming

Revit allows you to name views whatever you desire within a project.  This can be beneficial and aid in your workflow process, or it can be detrimental to your productivity.  It is important that views be named for easy retrieval and purpose definition, especially on larger projects.  Larger projects can have hundreds of views when the drafting views for details are included in the overall quantity.  Without an effective view naming process, a user can easily lose a great deal of time searching for the correct view.  When multiple users work on the same project, the impact to productivity is compounded.

The last thing users should be doing is naming views without any standards.

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