Create Type Catalog from Existing Revit Family

There are times that a Revit user will come across a family where the family creator added many types to the family.  I recently talked to someone that had a family with over 100 types defined within the family.  This has the following ramifications:

  • It increases the size of the family.
  • It creates many family types in the project that are not needed.
  • It displays a long list of types in the Type Selector for the family making it confusing finding the desired type.

Fortunately, Autodesk Revit has provided us with an easy way to create a Type Catalog that contains all of the types contained within the family.  This eliminates the need to have a family with a huge list of types within it.  We can create the Type Catalog directly from the family, so we do not need to recreate the data contained in each family type.

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Schedule Organization Improvements in Revit 2018.1

For a long time, I have wished that there were better ways to organize schedules in Revit’s Project Browser, especially in project files with dozens of schedules.  The recently released 2018.1 version of Revit does just that and allows me various ways to organize my schedules in a Revit project file.  Different disciplines and different companies have varying quantities of schedules, so some users will appreciate this new feature more than users.

The following image shows grouping the schedules based upon working schedules and schedules that will be placed on sheets.  This particular option is created by having 2 different View Templates for schedules – one for working schedules and one for schedules on sheets.  Schedules are then grouped by View Templates.

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Starting View Using Parameters

It is pretty typical for organizations to utilize the Starting View function within Revit and use that view to show project information.  That information often includes project name, project number, project address, and other important data.  Ideally, some of that information would be displayed using the same project parameters as used in title blocks to maintain consistency.  It can.

I believe that using a starting view is “good BIM” and good utilization of the starting view is very important.  It can help the model load more quickly and give the user important information about the project since it will be the first view seen when opening the project file.

Many organizations use a drafting view as their starting view.  When using a drafting view, project parameters cannot be used since labels are not allowed in a drafting view.  A “Label” is needed in order to use a parameter and are used in families.  If a drafting view is used, regular text needs to be used for the information.

A good method to use project parameters in your starting view is to utilize a sheet with a custom title block for the starting view.

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Personal Section View in Revit

Creating sections in a Revit model is key to creating a quality 3D model, and that includes creating sections that are simply used for design verification.  Construction documents typically include sections, but users also use a lot of temporary sections for coordination and verification.  A problem with temporary sections is that you don’t know who created the section and the purpose for the section.  As a result they tend to stay in the model because no one really knows if they can delete the section.

I previously wrote a blog article about creating Working Sections which helps with this situation.  However, the working section can be further enhanced.  This article will address 2 key features for improving the working section:

  1. Who created the working section.
  2. Apply a user’s specific settings for the working section.

Note that this article will build upon that previous blog article.  You can find the article here.

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Please Use Spaces in Revit MEP

Autodesk Revit includes the ability to define enclosed areas within the building as Rooms or Spaces.  While both items allow the user to assign a name and number to the area, they have different purposes and parameters for information within that designated area.  To put it in the most basic of terms, Rooms are for Architects, Spaces are for Engineers.

I have talked with engineers that don’t believe that they have any need for Spaces.  They believe that using the Rooms in the architect’s model works just fine for them since all they care about is having a tag on the view that shows the room name and number.  If the engineer simply tags the architect’s Rooms, then the names and numbers will always be up to date.  This is a very narrow-sighted view of the purpose of Rooms and Spaces.

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Organizing Schedules in Revit Project Browser

Wouldn’t it be nice to easily organize your Revit schedules?  Revit provides the user with various ways of organizing views in the Project Browser to make it easier to find your desired view, but schedules do not have the same organizational capabilities of other types of views.  Most views have a “Title on Sheet” parameter that can be used to be display the desired title for that view when it is placed on the sheet and yet have the View Name parameter be something that organizes well in the Project Browser.  Schedule views do not have that “Title on Sheet” parameter.

Typically, users will name the Schedule view as the name that they desire to appear at the top of the schedule since the “Title on Sheet” parameter does not exist for schedules.  That naming process means that schedules may not organize optimally in the Project Browser since they will be listed alphabetically.  We want to achieve having a title that does not use the schedule name.

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Room Occupancy Load Tag in Revit View

As an Architect, I find it helpful to be able to look at a floor plan and see the occupancy load for each room, and some building permit reviewers require this information be shown on the plan.  My previous blog article addressed creating a schedule in Revit to show occupancy loads for rooms.  This article will take off from that point and desmonstrate how to create a room tag to place on a floor plan view that shows the occupancy load of the room.

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Revit Family Type Catalogs

When creating families in one of the Revit design software packages, various Types can be created inside the same Family file for variations of the family.  Since some families can grow to be quite large due to many different types, Type Catalogs are used to help control the size of the families in the project.  A couple of examples of this are various door sizes for a door family, and the many various sizes for structural beams.

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Revit Gypsum Board Walls And Ceilings

Autodesk Revit Architecture’s standard project templates contain a stock material named “Gypsum Wallboard”.  The problem with the stock material is that there is no surface pattern.  This works very well for walls since you typically do not want to see any stipple hatch in an elevation view of gypsum board walls.  However, this does not work well for gypsum board ceilings when you actually do want to see a stipple hatch in reflected ceiling plans.  The answer to this problem is to create a new material to use for gypsum board ceilings. 

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Revit View Naming

Revit allows you to name views whatever you desire within a project.  This can be beneficial and aid in your workflow process, or it can be detrimental to your productivity.  It is important that views be named for easy retrieval and purpose definition, especially on larger projects.  Larger projects can have hundreds of views when the drafting views for details are included in the overall quantity.  Without an effective view naming process, a user can easily lose a great deal of time searching for the correct view.  When multiple users work on the same project, the impact to productivity is compounded.

The last thing users should be doing is naming views without any standards.

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