Modeling in Revit With Point Clouds

Points clouds are becoming more commonly used as a resource for creating a Revit model.  In my Revit model creation from point clouds, I use a few techniques that I am sharing in this article to help ease the process for you.  While I am sure some others do things a bit different, I have found that these work well for me.  There are some tools on the market that assist in getting a Revit model from a point cloud, but many people do not have the financial resources for them or rarely use point clouds.  Therefore, this article is geared to those not having any additional tools.

This article does not address how to create a point cloud or manipulating it outside of Revit.  It only addresses using the point cloud for creating a Revit model.

Continue reading

Revit eTransmit

When sending a Revit project file to another person or company, it is nice to be able to send all of the associated files with the project file.  Revit has incorporated this command, thus enabling us to package up the required files to be sent together.  This is an easily overlooked command and many people are not aware of it.  AutoCAD has had this command for many versions.

Files included in the transmittal:

  • Linked Revit model
  • CAD links
  • DWF Markups
  • Decal Images
  • External Keynote File

Go to the Add-Ins tab of the menu system at the top.

Select the Transmit a model icon from the eTransmit panel.

 

 

 

 

Notes:

  •  Save all models prior to running the command.
  • Close all models.
  • Additional supporting documents can be added to the transmittal
  • Revit files prior to 2012 need to be upgraded to the 2012 version

 

 

Revit 2020 Family Offset Parameter

With each release of software, there seems to be little things that change, but are either not documented as a change or the documentation on being a change is buried and difficult to locate.  In Revit 2020, there are some changes in the built-in parameters for families when they are placed in a project file.  These changes can come into play when using automation, such as Dynamo.  While they may or may not have much impact on your particular usage of Revit, it is important information of which to be aware.

Continue reading

Opening with Varying Widths Throughout Revit Wall

It is common to have openings in walls that are not of a consistent width all the way through the wall.  An example of this is when a door is recessed into a brick wall and the brick opening is wider than the stud/masonry wall opening or the door.  The following illustration shows a door opening in a stud and brick wall with the brick opening wider to allow brickmould casing around the door.

Revit doors and windows, by default, have an opening that goes straight through the wall with a completely rectangular opening.  If you just use the default Door.rft or Window.rft with the default opening to create your doors and window families, you will not see the above jogged offset opening.

The secret to getting the walls to cut as you desire is to NOT use the Opening Cut that is in the family template, but use Voids instead.

Continue reading

Zooming In Revit Non-Graphical Areas

Revit is always full of little functions that are not really advertised by Autodesk, but are handy nevertheless.  Zooming in non-graphical locations is one of those functions.

The following locations allow you to easily zoom in and out.

Properties Palette

  • Since at least Revit 2016, we have been able to zoom in and out of the Properties Palette by holding down on the CTRL key and using the mouse scroll wheel.
  • Zooming within the Properties Palette returns to the default size when you exit the current project file.
  • Zooming within the Properties Palette is specific to each open project.  If 2 or more projects are open, zooming in the Properties Palette can be different for each project.

Schedules

  • Since Revit 2019, we can zoom in and out of Schedules by holding down on the CTRL key and using the scroll wheel on the mouse.

Space Name Update to Room Name

Within Revit, it is standard procedure for architects to use “Rooms” and engineers to use “Spaces” to delineate areas of the building.  This is due to how Revit utilizes each of these 2 categories of items, so each have their place.  An issue with this procedure is that Spaces and Rooms for the same area should have the same name, but this does not happen automatically.  This can cause problems with consistency between the architect’s plans and the engineer’s plans.

Since the 2017 version, Revit has given us a tool to help keep Room names and Space names consistent.  Prior to 2017, we had to rely on either naming the Spaces manually or utilizing one of the 3rd party tools on the market.  With this command, we can update all of the Spaces in the entire model to be the same as a Room that is in the same bounded area (if there is a Room element there.)  Autodesk slipped this command into the menu system and I don’t remember them promoting it, but it is a fantastic tool for engineers!  It can save hours of work trying to get Room and Space Names consistent.

Continue reading

Electrical Panel Feed Thru Lugs in Revit 2020

Revit 2020 has a new feature that will please Electrical designers.  Feed through lugs are now incorporated into Revit for your electrical distribution system.  Previously, electrical users had to utilize workarounds to represent this situation in their designs, so this will improve the documentation process and help with the electrical design.

As part of this new feature, Revit has added a new panel schedule template, which is called “Feed Through Lugs Panel“.  This panel is available in the Electrical-Default.rte and the Systems-Default.rte templates.  This panel template is accessible via the Manage tab -> Settings panel -> Panel Schedule Templates.

 

The process to actual set up the electrical panels to utilize the above Panel Schedule is shown below. Continue reading