Room Occupancy Load Tag in Revit View

As an Architect, I find it helpful to be able to look at a floor plan and see the occupancy load for each room, and some building permit reviewers require this information be shown on the plan.  My previous blog article addressed creating a schedule in Revit to show occupancy loads for rooms.  This article will take off from that point and desmonstrate how to create a room tag to place on a floor plan view that shows the occupancy load of the room.

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Show Room Occupancy Loads in Revit Schedule

Working with building codes is an important aspect of working as an Architect during the design stages of a project, and knowing the occupancy of each room is a key component to that.  This article will demonstrate how to create a Revit schedule that shows the occupancy load for each room in your BIM file.  It will use a key schedule as the source of information for calculating loads, so this article will address creating that key schedule as well.

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Clearance Zones in Revit Families – Part 2

My previous article discussed the importance of creating Clearance Zones inside Revit familes for equipment and items that need clearances for ADA, safety, air movement, or other reasons.  While that article also discussed the behind the scenes set up to get Clearance Zones into a Revit family, this article finishes the process of creating the actual Clearance Zone.

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Clearance Zones in Revit Families – Part 1

Many pieces of equipment in a building have clearance zones that are required around the equipment for a variety of reasons.  It may be a drinking fountain that requires ADA clearance, an electrical panel that requires code clearance in front it, or mechanical equipment that requires air movement or access clearance around it.  For whatever the reason, it is good to build that clearance zone into the Revit family so that it be used for interference detection through Revit or Navisworks.

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Access to Building Codes via Technology

Building codes are utilized all the time for the design and construction of buildings.  Most companies have hard-copy versions of the applicable codes sitting on desks or shelves in the office, but the codes can also be accessed online or via your smartphone for free.  This is great since we may not always have the hard-copy version available to us.  If we are out on a construction site, being able to access the codes with our smartphone or tablet is a great benefit.

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Using BIM for Building Code Analysis

As Building Information Modeling (BIM) becomes more commonly used by building design teams, usage of the model for code analysis will become more important.  Currently, designers use manual or custom-developed methods to check code compliance of a building, but automatic code-compliance checking is coming.

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Revit Views for Fire Rating Review

A very important aspect of designing and reviewing a building project is the code review process to ensure that walls, doors, windows, and other components have the proper fire ratings.  Autodesk Revit makes it very easy to quickly visually check those fire ratings by setting up visibility filters.  This article will show you how to set up a fire rating view to display walls and doors as different colors depending on the fire rating parameter of the object.  This view is not necessarily designed to be a full code plan for permit submittals, but is an excellent asset for in-house code reviews.
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